Tag Archives: Buyer

Appraisal Challenges and a Rebuttal with the VA

brick front doorThere is a lot of nervousness these days getting past the appraisal contingency, which is one of several things that a real estate contract usually hinges on when a purchaser requires a loan.  The contracts typically most susceptible are those from FHA and VA buyers, as these buyers many times can, and do offer more than the listing price, and the appraiser tends to scrutinize the property much more.  These loans require the least amount of down payment, with the VA requiring zero down.  A higher priced offer, over the list price, excites a seller as they see dollar signs, while a savvy agent knows that it must first get through the appraisal hurdle, or else the deal falls apart, or the seller has to lower the purchase price to the appraised value.   Many times an agent will meet the appraiser at the property in an attempt to educate, enlighten,  or justify the contract price using comparative listings and sold properties, as well as showing and detailing improvements, etc.  Some times this is helpful when done with tact, while other times it just annoys and ticks the appraiser off.  I typically just want to make sure that the appraiser is local and familiar with the area.  Homes that border neighborhoods and dividing lines can be tricky if the appraiser  is unaware of these boundaries, which a map does not show.

I am currently listing a home and in contract with a VA purchaser.  I felt that we priced the home fairly, in the sweet spot of the market.  We ended up getting two offers within a few weeks and settled in on one that was about $3000 under asking price.  All the inspections went well with no issues.  The appraiser called to let me know that the value would be coming in below the contract price, but wanted to give me an opportunity (known as “The Tide Water Process” only for VA loans) to submit my own findings and comparative sales.  I thought this was courteous, however, in our conversation he made it clear that he takes his job very seriously, and that he’s hardly ever wrong.  I interpreted that as, “go ahead and knock yourself out, but I’m not changing the value.”  I proceeded to send him the comps and a write-up as to the value of the home, including upgrades and details he may have missed.  Also I asked the question, “What other house can the buyer purchase in this area for the same price that is similar, where they can keep their kids in the same school” (which I knew was one of the buyer’s objectives).

End result:  The appraisal came in at the list price, $3000 over the contract price.  Go figure.  Seller is getting his money’s worth by hiring me.

Lesson learned:  Never give up.  Decent writing can go a long way.

Anyone else have experiences, good or bad with appraisers and appraisals?

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Keith Klassen, Broker

916.669.9030

Sacramento Housing Inventory (Spring/Summer 2013) – Like Trying to Find a Needle in a Haystack

However cliché this title sounds, buyers and some realtors alike are completely discouraged by the lack of homes to choomonoploy housesse from.  I just read the statistic that the median days on the market for a home in April 2013 was 12 days.  In addition,  the inventory has shrunk a bit further since then.  Buyers use to say or think, “If I don’t get this particular property, I will just wait for the next one.”  Now they are saying, “The next one might cost more than we want to pay (or can afford), or we may have to wait 4 months to find it!”

Some home buyers have told me that they are just going to wait until the next dip in the market.  This could be extremely wise, or they could be waiting a while?  Time will tell.  Ultimately, like my dad use to say, “You’ve just got to get on the merry-go-round, or stand on the sidelines and wait.”

Moisture in Windows – Real Estate Sacramento

I have viewed and sold so many homes with dual pane windows that have failed.  The clear, or should I say unclear, indication is fogged up glass.  When you try to clean them, you quickly realize that there is moisture trapped in between the two panes, hence the window has failed.  Most inspectors will tell you that this does not diminish the effectiveness of the window, rather it just looks ugly.  And typically the remedy is replacing the glass or the window, which can be costly.

I ran across an article/ad regarding a newer technology, whereby they can de-moisturize and repair the window by just drilling to small holes in the corners.  Sound great if it actually is legitimate.

Has anyone out there utilized this technology?  And more importantly, does it work?  If so, this would be a great innovation to all those failed windows out there.

Enjoy,

Keith Klassen – Real Estate Broker

916.669.9030

KeithAKlassen@gmail.com

One Fortunate Buyer in Sacramento CA

I just closed a deal that could not have gotten much better for the buyer.

1) She was paying $1700 in rent for a decent unit in Midtown (but, still a lot of money).  the buyer got into contract for $122,750 on a 1890’s Victorian home (just what she dreamed about!).  Here housing payments were going to be about $730/month.

2) We got into contract before April 30, 2010 as to qualify for the Federal Tax Credit of $8000.

3) We closed after May 1, 2010 so to qualify for the $10,000 Tax Credit from the State.

4) The appraisal came back at a value of $105,000, so the seller was compelled to come down to that price. Now her payments will drop below $650/month!

Let’s do the math… About $18,000 savings on the purchase price (with a lower deposit amount), $18,000 in tax incentives – that’s a nice, quick $36,000.

5) The home inspection came back very clean and the pest inspection had minor work needed.  A few bonuses:  We found out that the foundation was redone at some point in the last 10 years; The roof was only about 1-year-old; There is hardwood underneath the laminate overlay, which is part of the buyer’s dream too!

Congratulations Laila!  I look forward to champagne this afternoon.

Enjoy,

Keith Klassen – Real Estate Broker

916.669.9030

Is Green Really Worth the Green?

I caught a news piece this morning while at the gym.  The title was something like the one above.  The segment dealt with the question, Do energy efficient upgrades in a home make a difference in the sale price? Even with long-term energy savings, the short and resounding answer was, “NO.”  While it makes all the difference for the environment, the sale prices do not reflect the upgrades, whether it be solar, added insulation, dual flush toilets, Energy Star appliances, etc.  The target then got pinned on appraisers.  They bluntly said that it was the appraisers fault… [paraphrased] The appraisers are behind the curve on this one.  It’s the appraisers that have not gotten up to speed and are not giving correct value to these items.  When an appraiser sees a furnace, whether it’s energy efficient or not, they just see a furnace…”

Now I have friends that are appraisers that will read this and have an acid reflex response (a little sour taste in their mouth).  And I know theses appraisers do know the difference and can spot energy efficient systems.

I would love a response/rebuttal from the appraisal world.  Sound off.

And don’t kill/hate the messenger – I’m just reiterating what I saw on the news this morning.

Enjoy,

Keith Klassen – Real Estate Broker

916.669.9030

Energy Efficient Home In Sacramento CA

I am fortunate to do regular work with the developers, Housing Group Fund, especially in acquiring and selling properties.  They recently partnered with Smud (our local utility company) on a home in a middle to lower-income area to rehabilitate it and make it energy-efficient.  Yesterday they held an open house for the real estate community.  They had the Quad-Lock blocks on display (see an earlier post of mind on this product, on this home).

This home is a great example of what true stimulus can accomplish.  Neighborhoods that usually do not get attention like this, could be transformed.

A friend of mine and appraiser, Ryan Lundquist, was there too and put together a fantastic video showing off the home.  Check it out below.

Enjoy,

Keith Klassen – Real Estate Broker

916.669.9030

New Energy Efficient Technology

This post is not very sexy, but hopefully interesting.  No special windows or solar-power… just insulation.  I work with a (re)developer that is partnering with Smud (our local utility co.) on a rehab project in South Sacramento.  Smud’s claim is that this is the first house on the west coast in which this product has been use.  In layman’s terms, it’s a foam, interlocking block that is stacked up around the outside of the house.  Wire and stucco are then applied.  Supposedly it is extremely easy to install (my kids would love to get a hold of this stuff) and super energy efficient.

Enjoy,

Keith Klassen – Real Estate Broker

916.669.9030